Buddhist temple

Couple accused of making Buddhist temple “look like a cooperative”

Couple who turned Grade II listed building into a Buddhist temple are accused of making it “look like a co-op” after painting it BLUE without obtaining a building permit

  • Kaspa Thomson and his wife Satya Robyn bought a listed building for their association
  • They took seven years to transform it into a Bright Earth Buddhist temple
  • It was originally painted cream with dark red trim when it was first built in 1820
  • They spent £ 6,500 to reconstruct and repaint parts of the building in turquoise blue
  • But the decoration sparked local anger because the couple were not allowed to change the exterior of the Grade II listed structure.










A Buddhist couple received instant karma from their neighbors who accused them of making a Grade II listed building ‘look like a cooperative’ after painting it turquoise blue.

The Bright Earth Buddhist Temple underwent a dramatic makeover earlier this year, but the charitable foundation that runs it hasn’t applied for a building permit.

The iconic Grade II listed property in Malven, Worcestershire was originally painted cream with dark red trim when it was first built as a guest house in 1820.

It was bought by a charity and managed by Kaspa Thomson, 40, and his wife Satya Robyn, 46, in 2014, who have spent the past seven years converting it into a Buddhist temple.

Kaspa Thomson, 40, sparked local fury by repainting the exterior of Bright Earth Buddhist temple in Malvern, Worcs, turquoise blue despite the lack of a building permit

The trustees spent £ 6,500 to re-render and repaint the building’s facade in March.

But locals expressed fury after the original fascia and decorative band around the building were changed to turquoise to reflect Buddhist faith.

For any listed property, you need the consent of the listed building to make changes to both the exterior and interior of the building.

One resident ranted, “The new paint job looks awful and doesn’t match the area.

“You can see the bright blue roof towering up in front of you as you walk past the building and at first I thought they had opened a new co-op.

The iconic Grade II listed property in Malven, Worcestershire was originally painted cream with dark red accents when it was first built as a guest house in 1820. Kaspa and her Satya woman spent £ 6,500 to redo and repaint the facade of the building, including changing from red to turquoise blue

The iconic Grade II listed property in Malven, Worcestershire was originally painted cream with dark red accents when it was first built as a guest house in 1820. Kaspa and her Satya woman spent £ 6,500 to redo and repaint the facade of the building, including changing from red to turquoise blue

Before renovation: The iconic Grade II listed property in Malven, Worcestershire was originally painted cream with a dark red border

Before renovation: The iconic Grade II listed property in Malven, Worcestershire was originally painted cream with a dark red border

“The building is in the historic district of Malvern with amazing views, so it attracts a lot of visitors, but I have to say the new paint job makes it look cheap and tacky.”

Another resident said: “Although I appreciate that the request is from a Buddhist temple and that turquoise is a color they use, I think the color turquoise does not harmonize with the buildings at all. surrounding the road.

“It’s way too bright and gives the building a rather garish look.

“All other buildings and shops are painted in much more subdued colors which in part reflect how the buildings would have been when they were originally constructed.

“I would like this to be maintained in the appearance of all buildings, regardless of their destination. “

Council planners will decide next month whether the blue makeover can stay or should be repainted red

Council planners will decide next month whether the blue makeover can stay or should be repainted red

The Buddhists who run the temple have submitted a retrospective planning request to the Malvern Hills Council.

In the app, they said, “In Buddhist color theory, turquoise represents enlightenment and wisdom.

“For this community – where there is a strong push to take care of the earth – blue also represents the predominant color of the earth as seen from space.

“The proposed work will restore the integrity of the plaster and restore the appearance of the facade of the building.

“The new highlight color is an attractive highlight for the existing building and does not detract from the special interest of the site.”

Council planners will decide next month whether the blue makeover can stay or should be repainted red.

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